10 Ridiculously Sexist Vintage Ads

10 Ridiculously Sexist Vintage Ads

If you’re not familiar with the term “sexism,” it’s defined as prejudice, stereotyping, or discrimination, typically against women, on the basis of sex. The advertisement shared for this article is an excellent example of how society viewed women in the past. From being shown as house cleaners to being depicted as overly sexualized objects, these ads are offensive and disrespectful – but they really give us a glimpse of what life was like for women back then.

A time where women were not given a voice and were subjected to extreme misogyny.

Vintage Ads Show The Sexist Attitudes Hiding Behind A Politically Correct Society

These days we like to think that we live in a politically correct society and that sexism has been eliminated. But whether it be through ads or our everyday lives, sexism is still all around us and it doesn’t always take the form of being outright offensive. Vintage ads show the sexist attitudes hiding behind a politically correct society. There was a time when it wasn’t uncommon for companies to use outdated stereotypes and offensive caricatures in order to sell their products. These ads were often designed to target a specific gender, race, or social class so that they’d be more inclined to purchase the product being advertised.

A Look At Early Propaganda Techniques

In the early days of advertising, commercial concerns were often more focused on manipulating customers than informing them. It was a time when ads were still evolving from simple commercial announcements to a more sophisticated form of persuasion. And while some “sex sells” tactics may be part of modern American capitalism, there was no shame in using it back then. One ad for Michelin tires actually includes the caption “A man behind every great woman.” As the feminist revolution took hold, advertisers were forced to play catch-up. Women empowerment was not just limited to the home front, many brands sought to convey the idea that women were capable of being both great mothers and accomplished workers. These propaganda techniques created by advertisers are difficult to believe looking at them today.

What We Can Learn From These Ads

With all of the recent discussions about sexism and misogyny, one would think that our society has made great strides in the fight for equality. Sadly, this is not the case. The messages we see about women and their roles in society seem to be stuck in time; we’re still hearing messages like “Women should be seen and not heard” or seeing ads like these vintage examples.

You may recall that in the 19th century, cigarettes were marketed as a luxury product. They were advertised as a status symbol and a sign of social superiority. Just like with alcohol, tobacco companies started to market cigarettes as a way for women to lose weight by smoking. It was also seen as a cure for depression and hysteria. But contrary to popular belief, this wasn’t some misogynistic promotion of the time – it was believed that women had weaker lungs and didn’t smoke enough because they were expected to be more passive in public life.

The ads show many ways in which women are objectified in society. They are often shown posing in seductive poses with very little clothing. There are also many examples of women being questioned about their knowledge of household products, implying that they cannot be trusted to take care of the house because they are not capable of anything else.

Conclusion

The verdict? Advertising is sexist.

It’s important to understand that it has been a long time since these ads were printed, and as generations come and go, they slowly begin to speak less and less about their sexism. I think it is also important to remind people of the past so they can avoid repeating those mistakes in the future.

After this article, I hope you will be more aware of the bias in advertising. The best thing you can do is to support companies that are committed to equality.

Thank you for reading and let us know what you think in the comments below. But first, take a look at these extra vintage ads.

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