The Surprising Truth About the Spiny Anteater’s Remarkable Tongue

The Surprising Truth About The Spiny Anteater’S Remarkable Tongue

The spiny anteater, also known as the echidna, is a unique and fascinating mammal that is native to Australia. It is one of the only species of mammals that lay eggs and is covered in spines for protection. But did you know that the spiny anteater also has one of the longest tongues in the animal kingdom?

In fact, the spiny anteater’s tongue can extend up to 60 centimeters (24 inches) in length! This remarkable organ is covered in tiny hooks, which the anteater uses to capture ants and termites, its main food source. The tongue is so long that it wraps around the anteater’s head when it is not in use, and it can move incredibly quickly to snatch its prey.


Key Highlights:

  • The spiny anteater is a unique mammal native to Australia
  • The spiny anteater has one of the longest tongues in the animal kingdom, reaching up to 60 cm in length
  • The tongue is covered in hooks and is used to capture ants and termites
  • The tongue is attached to the ribcage, allowing it to extend further than other animals
  • The anteater uses its long snout to dig into ant nests and termite mounds, and then its tongue quickly captures the insects

What makes the spiny anteater’s tongue even stranger is that it is attached to its ribcage, not its jaw. This allows it to extend its tongue much further than other animals that are limited by the length of their jawbone. The anteater uses its long snout to dig into ant nests and termite mounds, and then its tongue goes to work, flicking in and out to capture as many insects as possible.

In conclusion, the spiny anteater’s tongue is a remarkable and strange adaptation that has evolved to help it survive in the Australian bush. If you ever have the chance to see a spiny anteater in the wild, take a moment to observe its unique tongue in action and appreciate the weird and wonderful ways in which nature works.


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